Friday, 25 December 2009

A Christmas Story For Unitarians That Is Strangely Interconnected With Famous Unitarian Rod Serling *Star* Host Of The Twilight Zone. . .

Liberal Christian who is a University Chaplain to Cambridge University, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge Regional College and a Police Chaplain for Cambridgeshire Constabulary, blogged about the New Testament story/myth of the Magi aka Three Wise Men on his CAUTE blog today. Some of his words reminded me of an old science fiction short story by Arthur C. Clarke and I decided to post a cautionary comment about 'The Star' to this blog post. In searching for a web page or two to link to that would help of Arthur C. Clarke's 'The Star' I discovered that a version of 'The Star' had been televised on 'The Twilight Zone' which of course was hosted by famous Unitarian Rod Serling. I feel that it is worthy of posting my comment here as a kind of Christmas story for Unitarian*Universalists albeit a somewhat "less than wonderful" one.

"To be faithful to the Christmas story and science is simply to keep looking for the new star and to be prepared to follow it *wherever* it leads, despite the profound challenges it will always bring to old ways of being and thinking."

And what if *wherever* that new star, or indeed rediscovered and/or resurrected "less than new star", leads you to causes profound challenges to current ways of thinking that have "less than pleasant" implications Andrew? You might want to read Arthur C. Clarke's science fiction short story 'The Star' written way back in 1955 to get *some* idea of what I am talking about here. Trust "famous Unitarian" aka "famous U*U" :-) Rod Serling to try to put a positive spin on the Twilight Zone's televised version of 'The Star'. . .

Who is to say that the "new star" in the east, that allegedly heralded the birth of Jesus Christ, wasn't a supernove that wiped out an alien civilization? But there are other "news stars" closer to home that have rather disturbing implications.

One of them turned 64 this year. . .